October 2020

Streetlight is skating into new territory

The skate park has been home to violence, drug and alcohol abuse, vandalism and general debilitating attitudes and behaviours for too long. Sadly COVID-19 has escalated this further and police involvement is far too regular.
Before Streetlight began, Ben & a group of volunteers were informed that running a program at the skate park wasn’t in the councils interest – and were declined permission to have a regular presence there.
Four years on, having witnessed the transformation that Streetlight has had in the lives of the young people over at the shopping centre, they are now reaching out to us! We have been invited to build relationships, develop trust and call out the potential within the hearts of the young people at the skate park. And instead of us supplying all the food and equipment, Playford Council has got it covered.     
If you, or someone you know has a desire to connect with young people, whilst showing off some new (or likely old) tricks, then get in contact with us, we’d love to hear from you.  

More Streetlight News?

Click here to hear the Rowe Family’s Oct 2020 News

Click here to read about Streetlight’s new missionary Jess

STREET EATS IS BRIDGING DIVIDES WITH A SIMPLE MEAL

WHEN YOU HAVE MORE THAN YOU NEED, BUILD A LONGER TABLE NOT A HIGHER FENCE

Elizabeth (Vicinity) Shopping Centre is a huge part of Playford Community. Just after 3pm a sea of young people flock through as they clock off from Playford International College. Before Streetlight existed, youth crime and conflict were so rife in the Shopping Centre, they introduced a rule that young people couldn’t gather in groups larger than three!

“The Centre has seen a reduction of incidents relating to youth theft and violence on Thursday nights since the program (Streetlight) started.” – Glenn Hanson, Centre Manager Elizabeth City Centre.

Whilst a lot has changed for the better, shifting long established attitudes of fear and resentment from shop owners and often a lack of respect from young people has been a slow bridge to build. Street Eats gave local businesses an opportunity to stop seeing young people as threats but rather adopt a mentality of hope and generosity. Many embraced the opportunity. Woolworths donated ingredients on a weekly basis, which assisted in combating food insecurity. On top of that, it gave us an opportunity to share with them current stories of the young people, and the way they were excelling in Street Eats, despite the constant challenges they were facing.

In completion of Street Eats, we all celebrated together over a meal at Caffe Acqua. Young people sat side by side with Woolworths managers, the mayor, family members and volunteers as we celebrated the success of, ‘a community where young people are empowered to reach their full potential.’ The mayor, Glenn Docherty, finished off the night congratulating each young person over a rather funny, COVID -19 friendly elbow bump and handing them a gift bag. The bag included personalised letters of recommendation that the young people can use when applying for employment opportunities. These opportunities are now much more obtainable due to a shift in attitudes from both the young people and prospective employees. The local newspaper, Bunyip, heard about the impact of Street Eats and shared the news via an article last week.

HOW A RECIPE FOR DISASTER BECOMES A SUCCESS

Street Eats recipes were designed alongside a dietician (Naomi Crosby) with a real focus on the young people and meeting them where they are at. We created recipes that were simple, affordable and most importantly appealed to the young people. Each week we pushed the boundaries, throwing in an extra vegetable, healthy habit or cooking skill. Every week they rose to the challenge.

Week five was certainly the most ambitious of the recipes, but we went with our gut feeling and well, heres the stories that came from it;

WANT TO CHECK OUT THE STREET EATS STORIES FROM OUR PARTICIPANTS? CLICK ON THE LINKS BELOW!

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